basava:

“Our strategy should be not only to confront empire, but to lay siege to it. To deprive it of oxygen. To shame it. To mock it. With our art, our music, our literature, our stubbornness, our joy, our brilliance, our sheer relentlessness—and our ability to tell our own stories. Stories that are different from the ones we’re being brainwashed to believe. The corporate revolution will collapse if we refuse to buy what they are selling—their ideas, their version of history, their wars, their weapons, their notion of inevitability. Remember this: We be many and they be few. They need us more than we need them. Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.”
―Arundhati Roy, World Social Forum, Porto Alegre, 2003

basava:

“Our strategy should be not only to confront empire, but to lay siege to it. To deprive it of oxygen. To shame it. To mock it. With our art, our music, our literature, our stubbornness, our joy, our brilliance, our sheer relentlessness—and our ability to tell our own stories. Stories that are different from the ones we’re being brainwashed to believe. The corporate revolution will collapse if we refuse to buy what they are selling—their ideas, their version of history, their wars, their weapons, their notion of inevitability. Remember this: We be many and they be few. They need us more than we need them. Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.”

―Arundhati Roy, World Social Forum, Porto Alegre, 2003

What McDaniel found was that skinheads were actually anti-racist (the skinhead he had met donned a Unity tattoo) and sought to remove Nazis and neo-Nazis. He quipped, “People that say that they’re nazis or hate another race or type of people don’t have a place in this scene.” Around the age of twenty-one and twenty-two, the social times had changed. What was considered outcast of the Black monolith such as wearing skinny jeans and mohawks were now accepted but still McDaniel felt like an outcast in the Black and Punk community. When speaking with the punks that he did meet, often he would be told that real punks don’t work or hold down jobs, they runaway and live on the street if not squat somewhere. McDaniel thought of those notions as foolish for he worked a job to help his mother with the bills. Once he had met a punk who was living on the street but had a Blackberry that his parents supplied him but still affirmed that he held true to the ideals of a “real” punk. Already McDaniel grew more and more disillusioned about what true punk was but he could tell it definitely not what was sitting in front of him chatting away on an expensive smartphone. The first Black skinhead McDaniel met was walking down the street with yellow laces in his boots, in his 40’s and an NYC old guard punk from the ‘80’s. His name was Joe. McDaniel stuck to him strongly and Joe became his mentor. He had straightened up Mc Daniel’s look, which was sorely needed at the time, and gave McDaniel a special piece of advice: “When you see a Black in the alt scene, talk to them. If they’re a freak, make them your friend. Don’t shun them.” It is also from Joe had McDaniel learn about S.H.A.R.P. – Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice – and the NYC chapter although plenty of the original members had dispersed. Joe taught McDaniel the dress code of a Sharp: White laces were for nazi, red laces meant communist, the American flag was always on the right arm, the pins were always precise and the Sharp should always look sharp, never show a sloppy appearance, to name a few.

http://Police respond after Portland arrest video goes viral http//www.kgw.com/story/news/local/2014/09/15/police-respond-after-portland-arrest-goes-viral/15685031/

Just to be clear, the news does not mention WHY this young man was beaten, but instead focus on how great PPD are dealing with social media.

Comments

This weekend, one of my students (16) was beaten and tased by the portland police department for asking why they were detaining him. PPD say he choked an officer, which cannot be seen in the video. This young man is an amazing, thoughtful and highly capable student and athlete. I’ve spent many hours working with him after school as he tries to keep his head above all the traps laid out for him. I’m left completely baffled and enraged by the incident. I’m tired of seeing young black men brutalized by the police. No one deserves that, especially this young man. He’s my heart.

There will be a demonstration in his name and against police brutality tomorrow (Tuesday) in Pioneer Square at 4pm. If you’re in PDX, please share this and come show your support.

minus18:

When you come out as trans, people sometimes take a while to adjust to your new pronouns, or don’t quite understand.

So we launched a new campaign to help! An article that introduces the topic, a video with a rundown from trans young people, and a web app where you can learn and practice pronouns!

Here’s our easy way to help your friends and family get your pronouns right and understand why it’s important.

cartoonpolitics:

"There is no thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives." .. (Audre Lorde)

cartoonpolitics:

"There is no thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives." .. (Audre Lorde)

wrapyourselfaroundmyfinger:

jonny-poopoo-pants:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

For The First Time Ever, All Four Eyewitness Accounts of The Murder of Michael Brown Put In Chronological OrderThe most detailed side-by-side telling of each eyewitness account of the Mike Brown murder in chronological order #JusticeForMichaelBrown [@ShaunKing]

Reblog the fuck out of this

BOOST^^^^^^^

Solidarity is not meant to be comfortable. It is not shining light on yourself as ally at the expense of the oppressed who are demanding their counternarratives be centralized. It is understanding that your whiteness protects you from certain things which in turn prohibits you from participation in others, because at the end of the day, when you get tired of marching and chanting, you can put your hands down and feel confident that the police won’t see you as a threat.
Some of us simply don’t have that luxury.
freeqthamighty on Ferguson (via criollokid)

Source: criollokid

I Don't Believe in Laziness

I also find myself wanting to ask, is “doing nothing” really so bad? Must we constantly be engaging in something productive? Why can’t we just relax, without having to justify whatever we’re doing to either ourselves or others? Something doesn’t have to be a “learning experience” to be worthwhile. Once we move past some puritanical (or maybe more capitalistic) mindset of having to be constantly engaged in something appropriately useful, we can really work on embracing all life has to offer, whether it’s useful to the economy or not. I don’t want to dissect the episode of Veronica Mars I just watched for any learning potential, I just want to enjoy it, and enjoy the discussions with my sister it sparks on the characters and plot and what we think might happen next…
Learning is always happening, whether we’re noticing it or not. But more importantly, just living, just existing and enjoying and working and playing and yes, learning, is enough. We don’t have to justify our very existence by being productive. Just being is good enough.
This is why I always wince when I hear the word lazy passing anyone’s lips. It’s demeaning, it further hurts children who are already struggling, makes people feel guilty and worthless, and just creates a horrible environment to live in, never mind for positive learning and growth. Learning happens best when people feel supported and challenged, not when they feel stressed and insecure, with people watching them in disapproval and muttering about laziness. If adults really care about learning, then they need to work on being more supportive and less critical, and erase the word lazy from their vocabulary, and the false concept of laziness from their minds.

My thoughts, exactly.